Which Republican presidential candidate is a racist?

The question, of course, is which Republican presidential candidates are racist.

In terms of the Republican Party, Trump is one of the most blatantly racist politicians in modern American history.

It would be an understatement to say he is a white supremacist.

He wants to take away people’s guns, restrict the freedoms of the press and to build a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border to keep out Mexicans.

He’s also been a proponent of mass deportation of immigrants and his presidential campaign is dominated by fear of Muslims and undocumented immigrants.

Yet Trump is also the only candidate in the field to say that the Holocaust was a hoax.

Trump’s presidential campaign has not just failed to win any of the states that he’s currently winning, it’s also failed to attract any serious support.

As a result, Trump has been in a virtual tie with Jeb Bush for second place in the delegate count, with Bush trailing in delegates by just about 100,000.

The only other candidates in the race who have been able to break into the lead are Chris Christie and Rand Paul, who each won their home states.

As for Trump, he’s not even polling anywhere close to Bush, who is polling around 1 percent nationally.

This is a candidate who has been at the center of a global pandemic, whose presidential candidacy has been overshadowed by the sexual assault allegations against Bill Cosby and who has made racially insensitive remarks about the families of African Americans.

In the end, Trump may not even be the Republican nominee for president.

But his campaign has given rise to some of the biggest controversy of the presidential election cycle.

The issue has been a source of much debate and a distraction from the most important election in our lifetimes.

The Republican Party is a party that prides itself on being inclusive and inclusive only, and not only for white people.

In a 2016 Gallup poll, 71 percent of Republicans and Republican-leaning independents identified as white, while 44 percent of Democrats and Democratic-leaning Independents identified as nonwhite.

For a candidate like Trump, the fact that the party has embraced him as a white nationalist is deeply offensive.

In fact, the Republican National Committee has done its best to distance itself from Trump and his views.

As The Daily Beast reported, the RNC has been actively working to distance the RNC from the presumptive Republican nominee.

The RNC did not respond to The Daily Caller’s request for comment.

But the party is clearly worried about a Trump nomination, and the RNC seems determined to do everything it can to avoid him.

Trump has received more than $2 million in campaign donations from the Koch brothers and other billionaire industrialists, the largest donation to a Republican candidate in history.

According to The Wall Street Journal, “The campaign has also hired an outside political firm to assist in its efforts to separate itself from Mr. Trump and avoid him from speaking to supporters or even running in the general election.”

And in August, Trump made a surprise appearance at a Republican Party convention in South Carolina.

While he did not endorse any candidate or call for the removal of the Constitution, he made a veiled reference to the recent wave of violence at his rallies.

He told the crowd, “I would never do this again,” adding, “but I will say this, you can’t let this happen to you.”

The Republican National Convention is the last opportunity for Republican candidates to gain the nomination before the party’s convention in Cleveland in July.

But that’s not the only thing that’s happening at the convention.

The convention is a major turning point in the campaign season.

The two major candidates for the GOP nomination are not only the most unpopular in modern history, they’re also the most vulnerable in the party, with more than half of Republican voters saying that they don’t know who they will vote for in the upcoming general election.

In an unprecedented move, Trump and Bush are both calling for the abolition of the Electoral College, which is what would have eliminated the possibility of a contested election and guaranteed the election of the winner.

The Electoral College has been the cornerstone of American democracy for nearly 200 years.

It was created by the founders of the United States, and has always been a safeguard against tyranny.

It’s been the single most powerful weapon in American politics.

In 1804, after the election was stolen from Abraham Lincoln by the Southern Democrats, James Madison wrote, “That the people of the States should be entitled to a free and just election, is a most precious and sacred trust.”

The Electoral Vote is the only voting system that allows one party to win an election and the other party to lose.

The Founding Fathers, however, were worried about how the electoral system would affect their political ambitions in the wake of the Civil War.

They wanted to keep the federal government in check and were worried that the Electoral Vote would allow the South to gain control of the White House and Congress.

The election would be decided by a combination of the House of Representatives and Senate, but neither the House nor the Senate is actually a democracy, as it’s dominated by the South